Right Wing Inspection Ports

November 19, 2012

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Tonight was an easy 1 hour night in the shop. Grey’s Anatomy was on (by “on” I mean “available on the DVR”), which makes it a good time for me to go tinker in the garage.

Let’s finish up these inspection ports.

Scuffed on the inboard side, just to help me remember which side is inboard.

After deburring and dimpling.

Then, on the actual wing skins, I deburred, countersunk, dimpled, and riveted on the -8 sized dimpled nutplates.

I actually took three pictures, but they all look the same. So you only get one.

After putting some screws in, they all sit pretty flush.

Good looking.

1.0 hours. 3 ports with 16 rivets each…so 48 rivets.

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Right Wing Skinned!

November 18, 2012

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Hey, look at that!

We’ve got some major visible progress going on here.

Cousin Taylor came over today and we got the rest of the right wing lower skin riveted.

So shiny!

You get a landscape version, too.

It feels pretty good to have the right wing skinned. All that’s left now is some inspection ports, the pushrods (which I’ll probably postpone until both wings are done).

After that, I’ll get started on the left wing.

1.5 hours for two of us, so 3.0 hours. 178 rivets. Yee haw.

If I break down the hours so far:

Emp (total): 160.5 hours

Misc Wings: 10.5 hours

Spars:  19.0 hours

Ribs: 18.0 hours

Wing: 79.0 hours

Tanks:  46.0 hours

Ail: 27.5 hours

Flaps: 30.5 hours

Wings (total) 230.5 hours

Overall (total): 393.0 hours

HOWEVER. Some of this work (aileron, misc wing, spars) was some left wing work, too. I’m going to estimate time to finish the left wing as Ribs (18.0), Wing (79.0), and tank (46.0) hours. That comes to 143 hours remaining on the left wing. I’ll probably go a little faster than that, but this is a good estimate, and puts me around 550 hours when I’m done with the wings. That sounds about right.

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Finished Flap Brace, Inspection Ports

November 13, 2012

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Well, with a few short minutes available to me in the garage tonight, I tied up a couple loose-end rivets and started on a new little mini project.

First, I pulled off the right flap and set these nine rivets with my economy squeezer. No big deal.

Hooray, now the flap brace and flap hinge is completely riveted.

Another angle, showing a completely cleco-free inboard wing.

Then, with about 15 minutes left, I pulled out the inspection covers.

I forget the part number, but there are six of them. Three for each wing.

Up to the drawing to see what hardware is needed.

Looks like #8 hardware.

Go searching through my hardware containers…

There they are.

Uh oh. There’s another set of hardware there on the left for the forward side of the inspection covers.

Oh no!

Oh yes.

I drilled the first forward edge to #19 drill size, then dimpled for a #8 screw.

After trying to fit a #8 screw into a #6 nutplate, I realized my mistake, and drilled them correctly on the other 2 (I’m only working 3 at a time.)

Foreground is correct (#6 screws), background is WRONG (#8 screws).

It’s a sad day when I have to make a deposit into the scrap bin. (sigh)

But, I kept at it, and borrowed one of the left wing’s covers (they aren’t handed, just one of the ones that were allocated for the left wing.)

I got them screwed into the forward (bottom in this picture) edge, and started matchdrilling the center holes.

They’ll look good when they’re done.

0.5 hour, 9 rivets.

Time to go run!

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The Case of the Missing Scarf

November 12, 2012

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Today, I had a day off work. This was excellent news because:

1) I needed a day off work.

2) The airplane needed me to have a day off work to get some stuff done.

Really, there are only a few things left on the right wing before I can call it complete and catch the left wing up. The lower outboard skin, inspection covers, pushrods, and wingtip. I’ll probably wait until both wings are complete to do the pushrods and wingtips.

That leaves the skin and the inspection covers.

Here’s the lower outboard skin, just kind of hanging on the wing (makes for good storage).

Also, You can see I kept my extra pieces of blue tape here while I finished the inboard skin.

After pulling the skin off, I realized that I already prepped the skin through deburring and scuffing the inboard side. Nice!

Already scuffed. (If you look at the date of the linked post, it was February….of 2011. Ouch.)

I guess you also get a closeup.

Anyway, I got the C-Frame out again and dimpled all the holes.

I did not dimple the wingtip attach holes. Haven’t even thought about those yet.

After dimpling, I cleaned the skin, took it outside, and got it primed between rain showers.

Back in on the workbench, it’s drying.

I still like doing the blue vinyl stripe trick.

While the skin dries, I went ahead and deburred and dimpled the rear spar. I was so lazy when I did the inboard wing, I only deburred and dimpled the holes required to get that skin in place.

Dimpling…done.

Then, I did the same deburr/dimple trick on the remaining spars.

You can see my conduit and wire-pulling string, also.

I guess this is another angle.

Okay, primer is dry. Let’s pull off the blue vinyl before getting the skin in place.

One bay.

All the bays. Man, those clean lines look good.

Oh, almost forgot to mention. Anytime you have a lap joint with two skins, don’t forget to use the edge roller to put a little kink in the edge. It helps lay the edge down when the two skins are pulled together.

My edge roller.

Here’s a good shot of how the skins lay on top of each other after rolling a bit of the edge.

Nice seam there.

After that, I didn’t think there was anything else before getting started. (I’ll come back to this.)

Getting the skin clecoed on.

After getting the first bay riveted, I realized I had forgotten to bevel the two skin edges like I had on the upper skins.

So, here’s my plan: leave it alone. The  amount it sticks up is minimal, and the bottom of the wing is less critical than the top (so says physics). I’ll either remember on the left wing, or do it the same so they are symmetrical. I’m going to go talk to our super-smart aero guys to see if there is any real concern.

After the first bay…

Then, with much straining, pulling, pushing, stretching, etc. I managed to get the second bay done, too.

To help you see what I’ve completed, I pulled the blue vinyl off where I’d finished.

It looks soo good.

Counting rivets, that two at the top is a “carry-the-two.”

So. 3.5 hours, 107 rivets. Not bad.

Taylor, get your butt over here so we can do some more.

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Three Eighths of a Hooray!

November 8, 2012

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Well, I feel like it was only a few posts ago that I had the ceremonial “changing of the environmental control system” in the garage.

Alas, it was cold yesterday in the garage, so we (yes! Cousin Taylor’s back to help!) decided to perform the heater ritual. Ah, the sweet localized warmth of the heater.

We were kind of elbowing each other out of the way all night to stand in front of it.

Last time Taylor was helping, we were just squeezing rivets on the flap.

This time, I needed his help shooting and bucking. Instead of just blasting off, we did about a 15 minute lesson.

I made him go through the whole routine:

Measure and Mark (see picture below), Drill, deburr, dimple…

Carefully marking a new hole on my practice piece.

Then, I shot one rivet, and then I made him do it alone, then we did a third one with him shooting and me bucking.

All three were perfect.

Since I’m so skeptical, I didn’t want to start into the bottom skins with only one teamwork rivet under our belt, so I drilled a few more holes and we shot the rest. They all ended up perfect, but we got a good feel for communication, etc.

I find it useful to explain that we want about 10 “hits” (although they happen so fast you can’t really count them) in about 1-1.5 seconds.

If some where a little light, I was able to ask for “4 more hits” or “6 more hits,” and he always delivered the perfect amount of additional shooting. Can’t ask for anything better than that.

We ended up setting the rest of the rear spar, rib, and main spar rivets (including about 8 that I couldn’t reach alone yesterday) and then 15 more on the flap brace.

For one of the “hard to reach” rivets, I was laying on the ground with my whole arm in the inspection port. I got my arm in there, then had to shift my whole shoulder into the port. Not comfortable, but we got it done.

Here’s the after shot.

We were too busy riveting to take any during pictures.

After getting the whole inboard skin done, we just had to peel off the blue tape.

You know, to give you a good reflection of my work benches.

1.5 actual hours, with 2 people. 3.0 build hours, 63 rivets.

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This is Not a Cry for Help

November 5, 2012

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No, I have not started cutting.

This is just me (and my hairy arm) working on getting some more of the right inboard bottom skin riveted.

Hairy arm!

Yup, it’s officially three days in a row!

I have to admit, though, that it’s a lot easier when you have all the rivets preloaded, and all you have to do is start banging away on them.

Tonight, I actually got two more bays done, in just 30 minutes. I couldn’t reach 5 of the rivets, so I really will need some help.

From this angle, the 5 rivets can only be reached from below, and my arm wasn’t long enough for both bucking and shooting. I’m sure I can get these with two people.

53 rivets in 30 minutes. Next time, I’ll probably be able to knock out the rest of the inboard skin, then start prepping and riveting the outboard skin. Wuhoo!

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Some More Right Wing Lower Skin Riveting

November 4, 2012

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Well, I decided that with an hour to kill this afternoon after the Bears game (they whooped up on the Titans), I would go outside and see if I could do something productive.

I managed to get a few more rivets set in the bottom skins.

Let me apologize in advance, the pictures are in a weird order.

First up, I peeled back the skin to make sure I could get to the rivets I was interested in. But also, AND THIS IS KEY, you have to make sure that once you set those rivets, you won’t back yourself into a corner where you can’t reach another set of rivets, so I checked (what I’ll call) “future” rivets.

Basically, I reach through the lightening holes and then up with the bucking bar.

I can reach both sides for about 4 rivets before I have to reposition a little.

Also, be sure to be carfeul with the skin. Even the manual warns about creasing it.

After spending so much time cleaning, I was amazed at how quickly the workbench started filling up again.

I’m going to make an effort to keep everything clean at the end of each work session.

After 30 minutes of (loud) shooting and bucking, I called it quits on the loud stuff for the day.

I did the last wingwalk rib, and the main and aft spar rivets just outboard of that rib. I colored the heads black where I set them, just to help me count. This was 40 rivets.

Since the skin doesn’t have to be peeled back as much anymore, I set another 13 rivets of the hinge. (I’m getting good at installing and removing the flap. Not that I have to, I just like to store it on the wing. Seems the safest there.)

I also pre-loaded the next bay of rivets.

If you’re counting ribs, I am now halfway (4 of 8) done with the lower inboard skin. It’s going to get easier moving outboard, too.

I like seeing the clecos slowly disappear.

1.0 hour. 53 rivets. It’s not really a streak until it’s three days in a row, so don’t jinx me.

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